Jason Isbell Performs Oct. 16 & 17

Ticket Link for Friday, Oct. 16

Ticket Link for Saturday, Oct. 17

Two Night Bundle Ticket Link

 

w/ Special Guest Hiss Golden Messenger$39.50
Doors Open: 7:00 PM | Show Starts: 8:00 PM

Tickets Can Also Be Purchased:
Etix Hotline: 1-800-514-3849
Music Hall Box Office: 37 John Street (843-853-2252)
Tues – Fri. 1pm – 6pm (Summer Hours)


Jason Isbell

Acclaimed, award-winning artist Jason Isbell will release Something More Than Free, his highly anticipated fifth album, on July 17 via Southeastern Records. Something More Than Free features Isbell’s Southern-inspired vignettes of working class men, women and traditions that permeate these 11 new songs. The pure honesty and authenticity of Isbell’s poetic lyrics and soulful vocals have connected deeply with so many, and they shine as brightly as ever on Something More Than Free.

Something More Than Free is Isbell’s most sonically diverse album to date. The opening track, “If It Takes A Lifetime” exudes a classic country tone, while “24 Frames” flows effortlessly with its easy, Laurel Canyon vibe. The wistful folk balladry of “Flagship”, along with the bluesy Southern rock timbre of “Palmetto Rose” and epic “Children Of Children” prove that Jason Isbell is an artist whose creative pinnacle has yet to be within sight.

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journalto NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross (See Highlights). Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (“Cover Me Up”) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. Catch Jason and his wife Amanda Shires during a very special performance on The Late Show with David Letterman on April 24.

Along with the media support, the success of Southeastern was the product of good old-fashioned hard work. Much like the working class subjects in his songs, Isbell grinded it out with his band The 400 Unit on the road. They toured extensively, made real connections with his audience, poured his heart out each night and stayed true to his convictions. Audiences grew as venue sizes expanded with sold out shows throughout the U.S. and Europe, including New York’s Beacon Theatre and three sold out nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium, where an unprecedented four-night stand has been announced for October 23-26. See tour dates below.

Something More Than Free was recorded at the Sound Emporium in Nashville, TN and produced by Dave Cobb, who also produced Southeastern. Follow Jason on Twitter @jasonisbell or visit http://www.jasonisbell.com


Hiss Golden Messenger

I first met M.C. Taylor—the craggy-voiced patriarch behind Hiss Golden Messenger, the country-rock ensemble he leads out of Durham, North Carolina—in the winter of 2012. There were things I thought I knew about him, narratives I’d brazenly culled from the HGM discography, then four records deep: here was a guy, I figured, who understood something about devastation, redemption. He was dressed in black jeans, a plaid shirt, black boots, and a worn denim jacket, and he spent a good part of that dinner yanking off his baseball cap, pressing his short blonde hair back and to the side, and then hooking the hat back on, tugging the brim lower, obscuring his blue eyes. Taylor can be a welcoming presence, generous and funny and deeply humane, but he is also a person who appreciates and requires certain solitudes. There was something about the way Taylor, a Californian, moved, how he leaned into a wall or exited a room with his shoulders bending slightly forward—not hunched, but reaching—that suggested to me an unknowable inner life, as if he were following a beacon others weren’t privy to. He would later describe his vibe as “a little bit standoffish” (and he was being self-effacing), but I immediately got the sense he didn’t abide much bullshit.

Back then I didn’t know what it was about Taylor’s music that made me feel so much less alone, why it proffered all that solace, why it felt like the perfect articulation of some deep, grown-up restlessness. I still don’t know what it is—not really. But the fact of it remains: he is, to my ears, one of the best songwriters working right now, significant even among the handful who know how to sing about life in a way that feels true to its tumult.